For free movement of EU citizens and workers within

For the first time asylum applications received in 2015 in
the EU has reached unprecedented levels, twice as many as in 2014. In some
parts of the EU this number is lower than in other parts and these inflows has
increasingly affected public authorities in the countries most concerned.

 

First shoch and feelings of empathy have been increasingly
accompanied by worries about the consequences that the refugee crisis will have
for society, institutions and labour markets. Causing temporary closings of
Schengen borders and resistance to a fair allocation of refugees across Europe,
in almost all the EU member states these worries have influenced public opinion
and political action.

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Although
it is more pronounced for some Member States than others, the short-term
economic impact of the refugee inflows on the EU’s GDP appears small and
positive. When we speak about medium to long term, it usually refers on how
well refugees are integrated into the labour market will be a key factor in
determining the macroeconomic effects that refugee inflows will have on Member
States’ economies, while the short-term effect is mainly driven by higher public
spending, Refugees can help to improve the performance of the labour market,
address demographic challenges, and improve fiscal sustainability, if well and
quickly integrated. Migrants will make a positive contribution to growth and public
finances in the medium term, if they integrate faster. The answer to any crisis
must be ‘more Europe”, where the refugee crisis gives Europeans another
opportunity to strengthen and modernize their bonds, therefore the Europe must
certainly revisit its overall immigration policy and must not lose its
democratic ideals and the European idea.

 

The
free movement of EU citizens and workers within the European Union is enshrined
in the European Treaties and represents one of the cornerstones of European integration
and there is no place for first and second-class citizens. The free movement of
labour can foster economic dynamism, promote economic growth and advance
competitiveness and any intentions of restricting the free movement of labour
as a fundamental right stand against Europeans’ well-understood interests in a
dynamic and prosperous economy.

 

Europe
therefore needs to join forces to expand the European dream, but the benefits
of the EU come at a price. The current refugee crisis has also the potential to
mark the end of the European idea and could mark the dawn of a new era.In this
case, Europe must act jointly and seize the chance to reinvent itself to
ultimately become the ‘United States of Europe.’