ResultsThe The vegetation of this point has the typical

ResultsThe graphs here present the results collected using the methodology explained before. For each site, I have given some general information on its location, size, plant life, and other biotic factors. Table 1 includes information such as: site visited, species richness, and the calculated SAA amount. It is important to note that each site was visited 10 times. The species richness should be the same number for both sites as this is the total times seen the species, regardless of area. I have included all species but three, the hummingbird, the red breasted nuthatch, and the woodpecker, for they were found to be outliers; seen less that 3 times.Table 1SiteSpeciesSpecies RichnessSAASite 1Black capped chickadee165Site 1Mountain chickadee55Site 1Pygmy nuthatch121Site 1Black billed magpie103Site 1American crow81Site 1Stellars jay50Site 2Black capped chickadee1611Site 2Mountain chickadee50Site 2Pygmy nuthatch1211Site 2Black billed magpie107Site 2American crow87Site 2Stellars jay55The areas where this data was taken from are:Alderfer Three Sisters ParkLocated in the town of Evergreen, Colorado, the Alderfer Three Sisters park is about one mile west of the downtown area, the busiest region of Evergreen. This goes to show the topographic diversity of this municipality. There is another public park bordering the Alderfer Three Sisters park and bordering that park is the town lake which is about half a mile long.Site 1This and the other site are small areas (about 30 feet by 30 feet each) and are part of a greater forest. The vegetation of this point has the typical aspects of the Evergreen forests, dense amounts of trees and boulders. This point was 240 feet from the main road of this area (Buffalo Park Rd) which brought lots of disturbances nearby the site. The SAA is consistently a very low number, about 75% less than those of Site 2.Site 2I observed birds in this point come in and out of an uncovered, treeless, spot about 30 feet by 30 feet which allowed for plentiful amounts of sunshine to hit the tall grass below. This small patch was very popular for butterflies during their migration as well. This area had the aspects of a field, but served as a successful survey spot because it was very popular among birds in the area. This point was about 880 feet from Buffalo Park Rd, an obvious distance increase from Site 1. Since disturbances from the main road were unnoticable from Site 2, the only common, problematic disturbances in this site were hikers and weather factors. Though still problematic, these are clearly less problematic than disturbances in Site 1. This is revealed by the SAA comparisons in Table 1.ConclusionsThe results presented here conclude that:My methodology of this survey proved to be efficient for collecting representative data;The data obtained exhibited an accurate and quantitative negative correlation between disturbances and biotic factors which can be proven by the comparison of SAA numbers by site;The quantitative values found also support the claim that weather conditions indicate expected association with bird behavior;It is necessary to take note of nearby areas so the observer will know what to expect in their own area;Detailed analyses should be shared with the association that owns the park to better their own personal data;Acknowledgements SciELO: Bird community as an indicator of biodiversity: results from quantitative surveys in Brazil; University of California, Davis Library: Avian Science, Birds, Humans, Environment; Environmental Science: Birds as Environmental Indicators; Scientific American: Massive Genetic Effort Confirms Bird Songs Related to Human Speech; US National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health, EMBO Reports: The Human Impact On Biological Diversity, How Species Adapt to Urban Challenges Sheds Light on Evolution and Provides Clues About Conservation; Science Direct: Effects of Landscape Structure, Habitat and Human Disturbance on Birds, A Case Study in the East Dongting Lake Wetland